Multiplying Polynomials 5

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Taught by YourMathGal
  • Currently 4.0/5 Stars.
7639 views | 1 rating
Part of video series
Meets NCTM Standards:
Lesson Summary:

In this lesson, we learn about the special product of multiplying (a + b)(a - b) to get the difference of two squares. The instructor teaches various methods to multiply polynomials, including foil, smiley face and box method. By the end of the lesson, the students understand how to use the formula for the difference of two squares to simplify expressions and solve problems more efficiently.

Lesson Description:

Part 5 of Multiplying Polynomials covers the special product of multiplying (a + b)(a - b) to get the difference of two squares.

More free YouTube videos by Julie Harland are organized at http://yourmathgal.com

Questions answered by this video:
  • How do you multiply two binomials?
  • What are some methods for multiplying binomials?
  • How do you multiply (2x + 3)(2x - 3)?
  • How do you multiply (m - 4)(m + 4)?
  • How do you multiply (a + b)(a - b)?
  • How do you know if the middle terms will cancel out when you multiply two binomials together?
  • What are the FOIL and smiley face methods for multiplying binomials?
  • What is the formula for a difference of squares?
  • When do you get a binomial as a product when you multiply two binomials together?
  • How do you multiply (3x + 4)(3x - 4) using the box method?
  • How can you multiply two binomials using the difference of squares formula?
  • How do you multiply (F + L)(F - L)?
  • How do you multiply (m^2 - 3)(m^2 + 3) using the difference of squares formula?
  • How do you multiply (b^3 - 5)(b^3 + 5) using the difference of squares formula?
  • How do you multiply (x + 7)(x - 7) using the difference of squares formula?
  • What is a special binomial product?
  • Staff Review

    • Currently 4.0/5 Stars.
    This lesson shows multiple examples of multiplying binomials of the form (a + b)(a - b) that end up resulting in a difference of squares that look like a^2 - b^2 because the middle term cancels out. There is a lot of repetition, which should drive home the point of this video.